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TWO GREAT TASTES THAT TASTE GREAT TOGETHER DEP’T.

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Once you recognize this pattern, you taste it everywhere.

From Hmm Weekly
On July 21, 2021

Having Faith in a Secular World

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When secularism is practically a religion, what does it mean to believe, be spiritual, and attempt to see beyond ourselves? Does life have no meaning beyond what we are capable of understanding?

From No Man Is an Island
On July 20, 2021

[REVIEW]: Meron Hadero’s Sense of Hope

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Hadero shows us two worlds, dialectical at best: one of ease and comfort, enjoyed by foreigners, and the other of lack and precarity, experienced by locals. The “new” Ethiopia, depicted in her story, has no space for the poor and their “homes made of cloth and rags and wood.” This depiction typifies the irony at the heart of capitalist modernity pursued by the neocolonial elite.

From Olongo Africa
On July 21, 2021

The Roots of Nigerian patriarchy

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This post is co-published in partnership with our Brick House colleagues at Olongo Africa

From Preachy
On July 20, 2021

Loss For Words: A Meditation on the Ubiquity of Bizarre Corporate Language

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An entire, incredibly lucrative subsection of San Francisco was obsessed with its own specialness, obsessed with its own branding, obsessed with rhizomatically repopulating the place with the wealthy and the connected and the well-named and the delicious and the glossy and the expensive and the beautifully off-kilter and the minimalist and the carefully plated and the monetized history and sun sliding down over the ocean and the fig trees.

From Popula
On July 20, 2021

Corporate Giants Mum on Chamber’s Lobbying Against Voting Rights Bill

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As the U.S. Chamber of Commerce spends big on lobbying against the For the People Act, some member companies earned low grades on a new voting rights scorecard.

From Sludge
On July 20, 2021

The Religious Root of Nigerian patriarchy

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The idea of feminism in Nigeria itself has been identified as a threat to men. Patriarchal structures dictate that being submissive and loyal no matter the circumstances is what a good religious woman should be. This doesn’t speak for any one religion, but rather for all: Women who identify as feminist in Nigeria are criticized and mocked using all means to dissuade us from the very idea.

From Olongo Africa
On July 20, 2021

Review: “Born to Be Human” Interrogates Medical Violence Against Intersex Individuals

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Building off of Taiwan’s complex relationship with intersex issues stemming from the 1950s, 2021’s "Born to Be Human" brings light to contemporary misunderstandings of intersex people and the continued medical violence they face. The film proves an emotionally harrowing look at the medicalization of the gender binary through the lens of intersex rights.

From No Man Is an Island
On July 16, 2021

Public High School Turned Me into An Agnostic

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I remember feeling as if my worldview expanded dramatically after leaving the bubble of private Catholic school. In public school, I met people of all backgrounds and was introduced to atheism, agnosticism, and evolution. My new friends influenced me to break the rules and challenge the norm in several areas of my life. I preferred what I found there.

From Preachy
On July 19, 2021

MR. WRONG: LATE ADAPTER

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Meanwhile, ha! I beat you, Apple! I think!

From Hmm Weekly
On July 15, 2021

Book Club: (Low)Life

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Book Club! Podcast! Chrissy is feeling oddly optimistic about the Eric Adams-Andrew Cuomo alliance, and jazz great turned boxing manager Charles Farrell visits the pod to talk with Harry and Vice’s Tim Marchman about his memoir that covers, among other things, playing with Sonny Rollins and Ornette Coleman, fixing fights for the mob, “the Moby Dick of boxing” and lots more. Stick around to the end to hear him play a little piano, too.

From FAQ NYC
On July 14, 2021

Altria’s PAC Reports First Donation to an Election Results Objector

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Several companies that said they were indefinitely pausing their PAC donations after January 6 are confronting the reality of wanting to help re-elect pro-business allies to Congress and are back to supporting Republicans who objected to certifying 2020 presidential election results.  Of the six senators who voted in favor of sustaining Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas) […]

From Sludge
On July 15, 2021

[REVIEW] Bound by Grief, Bound by Love

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I find myself randomly in my day, ‘seeing’ beyond the final pages before me, clamouring for more of Iryn’s words – there has to be more beyond the words currently captured in The Separation.

From Olongo Africa
On July 15, 2021

Weather Review: July 11, 2021

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Boiling instant ramen felt like toil in the kitchen.

From Hmm Weekly
On July 14, 2021

Review: “Hotel Iris” Exhibits Transgressive Love…and Taiwan-Japan Amity

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What happens when "Fifty Shades of Grey" meets Taiwan-Japan relations? Well, probably something like "Hotel Iris," a Taiwan-Japan co-production that just premiered at the 2021 Osaka Asian Film Festival.

From No Man Is an Island
On July 13, 2021

NONPROSECUTABLE: A REVIEW OF SHIORI ITO’S BLACK BOX

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Through personal narrative, journalist, survivor, and activist Shiori Ito examines rape culture in Japan.

From Tasteful Rude
On July 13, 2021

Pharma Companies Spend Billions More on Stock Buybacks Than Developing Drugs, House Report Finds

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The largest drugmakers spent $56 billion more on stock buybacks and dividends than on research and development from 2016 to 2020, according to a new House committee report.

From Sludge
On July 13, 2021

Is Extinction a Tragedy, or a Crime?

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Crime and punishment in the illegal wildlife trades

From Popula
On July 12, 2021

This is not a letter to my Christian School

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My view of religion had become deeply damaged. I entered college and then my professional career with a hatred and disrespect for it. Religion for me was synonymous with hypocrisy and greed. To me, it was a crutch for the weak.

From Preachy
On July 12, 2021

CAPTAIN PLANET

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From Awry
On July 12, 2021

A Beat Ahead or Behind of the World

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A Review of My Missing Valentine (消失的情人節)

From No Man Is an Island
On July 9, 2021

‘Zola’ is the Only Movie

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Who you gonna be tonight

From Popula
On July 9, 2021

Closer to the Nursing Home

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Is this the last magazine I'll read before I die?

From Popula
On July 8, 2021

Space Object of the Month: Saturn

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Items I will try to find: Saturn Why?: ’Cause … the rings When: July 24, 2021

From Preachy
On July 9, 2021

Alvin Bragg’s Bragging Rights

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Podcast! The Democratic nominee who’s all but sure to be the next Manhattan District Attorney visits FAQ for a lively conversation.

From FAQ NYC
On July 9, 2021

Infrastructure Month in Congress, For Real, This Time, Maybe

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Democrats have given themselves just a few weeks to pass a preliminary budget resolution for one of two infrastructure bills moving in tandem.

From Sludge
On July 8, 2021

Weather Review: July 4, 2021

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Fumes of charcoal starter hung on Central Park West. The sky was deep blue in the gaps between the gray-shaded clouds.

From Hmm Weekly
On July 8, 2021

How Anthony Azekwoh is Creating a Future of Myths

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At 8, Anthony read Nnedi Okorafor’s "Zahrah The Windseeker" and the novel “changed my whole perspective on Literature. Before then, I’d been reading all these Enid Blyton, Cinderella books and it never occurred to me that not only could a black person be in a book, the black person could even be Igbo. It blew my mind.”

From Olongo Africa
On July 7, 2021

T_H_E__M_A_C_H_I_N_E_S_: LAWN CARE

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Is your grass growing? Outside the regions of carbon dioxide–influenced aridity, presumably it is, as humans have planted it to do, which requires that the grass be cut. A circular activity! Frequently, human beings experience these sorts of circular activities as tedious.

From Hmm Weekly
On July 7, 2021

NIGERIA’S TWITTER BAN HURTS

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Like many policies and decisions implemented by this administration, the suspension will adversely affect Nigeria’s economy. It will also harm the country’s prospects for tech advancement and international collaboration. Activist movements will face disruption.

From Tasteful Rude
On July 6, 2021

Founding Editors

Maria Bustillos

is a journalist and critic whose work has appeared in the New York Times, the New Yorker, the Guardian, the Los Angeles TimesHarper’s, the Times Literary Supplement, ESPN, Bloomberg, VICEGawkerThe Awl, and elsewhere. She writes the public editor column for MSNBC at the Columbia Journalism Review.

Christina M. Greer

is an associate professor of Political Science and American Studies at Fordham University (Lincoln Center Campus), and the author of Black Ethnics: Race, Immigration, and the Pursuit of the American Dream (Oxford University Press, 2013). She’s also the politics editor at The Grio, a columnist for The Amsterdam News and a political commentator on MSNBC and NY1.

Myriam Gurba

is a writer and artist. She is the author of the true-crime memoir Mean, a New York Times editors’ choice, ranked by O, the Oprah Magazine as one of the best LGBTQ books of all time. Her essays and criticism have appeared in the Paris Review, time.com, and 4Columns. She has shown art in galleries, museums, and community centers.

Brian Hioe

is a founding editor of New Bloom, an online magazine covering activism and youth politics in Taiwan and the Asia Pacific, founded in Taiwan in 2014 in the wake of the Sunflower Movement. He is a translator and journalist writing on social movements and politics.

Mike Kanin

is the publisher of the Texas Observer. He is the founding publisher of nonprofit local daily the Austin Monitor. His work has appeared in the Washington City Paper, the Washington Post’s Express, the Boston Herald, Boston’s Weekly Dig, the Austin Chronicle, and the Texas Observer. He’s also served as the Washington City Paper’s City Lights Editor and as the co-founding editor of Unfit Times.

Jason Adam Katzenstein

is a cartoonist and comedy writer for the New Yorker and Current Affairs. He is the illustrator of the graphic novel series Camp Midnight for Image Comics and the writer and illustrator of the autobiographical graphic novel Everything is an Emergency for HarperCollins.

Alex Brook Lynn

is a filmmaker and journalist living on the isle of Manhatta. She has written and produced video content for the Daily Beast, the New York Daily News, the New York Press, and Vice.

Joe Macleod

is creative director of Hmm Weekly.

David Moore

is a co-founder of Sludge, an investigative newsroom on systemic corruption, and was director of the Participatory Politics Foundation, a nonprofit organization that built open-source technology for civic engagement.

Tom Scocca

is the politics editor at Slate. He is a former editor of Gawker and Deadspin, and began his career at Baltimore City Paper and the New York ObserverHe is the author of Beijing Welcomes You: Unveiling the Capital City of the Future.

Donald Shaw

is an investigative journalist who focuses on special interests’ efforts to influence politicians and shape public policy. He analyzed campaign contributions at MapLight and was the editor of OpenCongress.

Harry Siegel

is the senior editor for opinion at the Daily Beast. He writes a weekly column for the New York Daily News, is a visiting fellow at the McSilver Institute for Poverty Policy and Research at NYU Silver School of Social Work, and teaches at the New School’s Journalism + Design program. His long career in journalism includes stints at the New York Sun, the New York Press, the Village Voice, and Politico. He is co-author (with his father Fred Siegel) of The Prince of the City: Giuliani, New York and the Genius of American Life.

Sunny Sone

is a writer and editor living in Austin, Texas. Sunny has worked as an archivist, a bookseller, and a city reporter, and is presently digital editor of the Texas Observer and co-founding editor of Preachy. Sunny writes to spread tenderness.

Kọ́lá Túbọ̀sún

is a Nigerian writer, editor and linguist. His debut collection of poetry Edwardsville by Heart was published by Wisdom’s Bottom Press, Oxford, in 2018. His work has appeared in African Writer, Aké Review, Brittle Paper, the International Literary Quarterly, Enkare Review, Maple Tree Literary Supplement, PEN Transmissions, Jalada, Popula, Saraba Magazine, the Guardian, and ThisisAfrica, among others. He’s currently a Chevening Research Fellow at the British Library in London and was a Fulbright Scholar to the US in 2009.