A red-shouldered hawk holds a cicada nymph in its beak as it feeds in a lawn, Monday, May 17, 2021, in Columbia, Md. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

A Month’s-End Associated Press (AP) Photographic Celebration Of: CICADA

by
in Hmm Weekly
on May 31, 2021

Here we are, Memorial Day, a federal holiday to honor military personnel who have died in the performance of their duties. It is also the final day of Maywhich means The Brick House’s monthly allotment of Associated Press photos is about to reset. If we don’t use up our images, they don’t roll over to the next month, and that’s a waste of good Associated Press imagery and The Brick House’s fiat currency.

Hmm Weekly has been placed in charge of burning our unused subscription photos, and in honor of Brood X, we invite you to please enjoy this mass emergence of CICADA.

The Hmm Weekly Image Download Day is also a reminder that The Brick House Cooperative spends money to bring you the best (or, in this case, the most, every last drop of) online content we can. Please support us through our ongoing subscription drive or go ahead and make a one-time donation, thank you very much.

One of the millions of periodical cicadas in the area crawls on a tree on Saturday, June 1, 2019 after it emerged from a 17-year hibernation in Zelienople, Pa. The insects come out of the ground once the temperature reaches optimum, then climb into trees and make a droning sound to attract mates to breed. Their activity will peak between mid-May and mid-June, and then die off about four weeks after first emerging according to the Department of Agriculture web page. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic)
FILE – A cicada peers over a ledge in Chapel Hill, N.C., on May 11, 2011. Swarms of the red-eyed bugs reemerging after 17 years below ground offer a chance for home cooks to turn the tables: making the cicadas into snacks. Full of protein, gluten-free, low-fat and low-carb, cicadas were used as a food source by Native Americans and are still eaten by humans in many countries. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome, File)
An adult cicada moves along in Washington, Wednesday, May 12, 2021. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
An adult cicada hangs upside down just after shedding its nymphal skin, early Wednesday, May 5, 2021, on the University of Maryland campus in College Park, Md. The cicadas of Brood X, trillions of red-eyed bugs singing loud sci-fi sounding songs, can seem downright creepy. Especially since they come out from underground only ever 17 years. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
The abdomen of a cicada nymph stick out of mulch and soil, Sunday, May 2, 2021, in Frederick, Md. Trillions of cicadas are about to emerge from 15 states in the U.S. East. The cicadas of Brood X, trillions of red-eyed bugs singing loud sci-fi sounding songs, can seem downright creepy. Especially since they come out from underground only ever 17 years. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
An adult cicada sheds its nymphal skin on the bark on an oak tree, Tuesday, May 4, 2021, on the University of Maryland campus in College Park, Md. Trillions of cicadas are about to emerge from 15 states in the U.S. East. Scientists say Brood X is one of the biggest for these bugs which come out only once every 17 years. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
Millions of cicadas, like this one in Elmhurst, Ill on May 30, 1990, are expected to emerge in northern Illinois and southern Wisconsin over the next few days. The insects, like this one found in suburban Elmhurst, unearth themselves every 17 years to mate, shriek incessantly and cover backyards and forested areas with their brownish, crunchy bodies. (AP Photo/Charles Bennett)
A periodical cicada lands on a Daisy in a garden in Lawrence, Kan., Friday, May 29, 2015. Brood IV cicadas, the Kansan brood, are emerging in Texas, Oklahoma, Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska, and Iowa this spring. These periodical cicadas have a 17-year life cycle. The last time they emerged was 1998. (AP Photo/Orlin Wagner)
An adult cicada sheds hands from its nymphal shell soon after molting, early Wednesday, May 5, 2021, on the University of Maryland campus in College Park, Md. Trillions of cicadas are about to emerge from 15 states in the U.S. East. Scientists say Brood X (as in ten, not the letter) is one of the biggest for these bugs which come out only once every 17 years. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
A box of preserved cicadas, including emerging insects and molted exoskeletons, in storage at the Smithsonian Institution’s Museum Support Center in Camp Springs, Md. on Tuesday, April 23, 2013. A brood of cicadas are expected to emerge this spring in the Washington area. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
This undated handout photo provided by Brazil’s National Museum shows specimens of jequitiranabóias or snake cicadas, at the National Museum of Brazil in Rio de Janeiro. In Brazil the snake cicadas are feared because of their heads resemble that of a lizard. They even say that their bite can dry trees or kill people, but they are actually feed on plants and are harmless. (Museu Nacional Brasil via AP)
In this Nov. 30, 2019 photo, a rooster-tail cicada clings to a tree on the property of Joao Batista Ferreira in Belterra, Para state, Brazil. The area was jungle throughout Ferreira’s childhood. Today, his plot is an island of shade and birdsong in the middle of sweeping plantations. (AP Photo/Leo Correa)
A Cicada Killer Wasp sits atop a plant in Water Works Park, Tuesday, July 21, 2020, in Des Moines, Iowa. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)
The nymph shell of a cicada is seen on a branch of a pine tree with a U.S. Flag as a backdrop, Monday, May 24, 2021, in Lutherville-Timonium, Md. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)
A supermoon gives backdrop to an adult Brood X cicada, top, as a nymph cicada, bottom, makes its way up a tree, late Tuesday, May 25, 2021, in Lutherville-Timonium, Md. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)
University of Maryland entomologist Michael Raupp hold a mud turret built by cicadas before they emerge on the soil’s surface in a suburban backyard in Columbia, Md., Tuesday, April 13, 2021, before shoveling up and inspecting cicada nymphs. Soon after 17 years underground Brood X will emerge in 15 states from Indiana to Georgia and New York. Trillions of them. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
A cicada nymph is seen in an emergence tunnel in a shovel of dirt in a suburban backyard in Columbia, Md., Tuesday, April 13, 2021. America is the only place in the world that has periodic cicadas that stay underground for either 13 or 17 years, says entomologist John Cooley of the University of Connecticut. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
Virginia Borda gathers soil, temperature, location and other data at eight inches below the surface as part of an undergraduate class project to measure urban heat island effects on time and density of cicada emergence, Tuesday, April 20, 2021, on the University of Maryland Campus in College Park, Md. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
Virginia Borda gathers soil temperatures at eight inches below the surface as part of an undergraduate class project measuring soil temperatures to test for urban heat island effects on time and density of cicada emergence, Tuesday, April 20, 2021, on the University of Maryland Campus in College Park, Md. The bugs only emerge in large numbers when the ground temperature reaches 64 degrees. That’s happening earlier in the calendar in recent years because of climate change, says entomologist Gene Kritsky. Before 1950 they used to emerge at the end of May; now they’re coming out weeks earlier. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
Trinadee Jenkins photographs the canopy in a wooded area to gather data for an undergraduate class project to measure urban heat island effects on time and density of cicada emergence, Thursday, April 22, 2021, near the University of Maryland Campus, in College Park, Md. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
Dr. Zoe Getman-Pickering, a postdoctoral scientist at George Washington University, walks through Woodend Sanctuary and Mansion with cicada shells in her hair, Monday, May 17, 2021, in Chevy Chase, Md. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
University of Maryland entomologist Paula Shrewsbury, reaches for a cookie topped with a cicada nymph, Monday, May 17, 2021, in Columbia, Md. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
Denmark’s Crown Princess Mary and New South Wales Premier Barry O’Farrell look at a cicada while touring bush fire devastation in Winmalee 85 kilometers (523 miles) west of Sydney in Australia, Sunday, Oct. 27, 2013. Princess Mary and her husband Crown Prince Frederik visited the area to thank firefighters for their work during last week’s bush fires which destroyed more than 200 properties. The royal couple are visiting Australia to take part in 40th birthday celebrations for the Sydney Opera House, which was designed by Danish architect Jorn Utzon. (AP Photo/Rob Griffith, Pool)
Sia arrives at Spotify Presents The Creators Party at Cicada on Saturday, Feb. 13, 2016, in Los Angeles. (Photo by Rich Fury/Invision/AP)
Robby Graves, 3, eyes a cicada as it emerges from its shell in Elmhurst, Ill. on May 29, 1990. The Chicago area is going bonkers over the bugs with regular newspaper articles, nightly updates on local television news and even a special hotline heralding the emergence of cicadas in a 17-year cycle. (AP Photo/Charles Bennett)

We wonder where Robby Graves is now. Thank you for scrolling all the way to the bottom of this month’s Associated Press Image Dump.