grief

Lonely Night the Poet Sells Himself as Lover to Dream

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Ernest O. Ògunyemi is a staff writer at Open Country Mag. His writing has appeared or is forthcoming in Joyland, Tinderbox, Sierra Nevada Review, Journal Nine, The Indianapolis Review, Down River Road, Capsule Stories, No Tokens, The West Review, The Dark Magazine, Mud Season Review, Agbowó, Isele, and in the anthology 20.35 Africa: An Anthology of Contemporary Poetry III. He is the curator of The Fire That Is Dreamed of: The Young African Poets.

From Olongo Africa
On November 29, 2021
Categories

How People Grieve Through Religion

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What little I know of grief tells me that it does not follow logic, and that those in its throes will oftentimes grab on to anything to make sense of their feelings. In that, I could understand why he chose to rely on religion for sense.

From Preachy
On November 8, 2021
Categories

On Digital Obituary

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On the afternoon of my friend’s demise, I logged in to Facebook to discover a myriad of his pictures congregating people’s timelines. In those pictures, his face was distinct, sharp; his mien betraying the darkness saturating the day, binding us in that state of sadness with the thread of mourning.

From Olongo Africa
On September 1, 2021
Categories

[POETRY] by Jeremy T. Karn, for ek.

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sometimes I wish my uncle would've been the fourth Hebrew brother to come out of fire alive.

From Olongo Africa
On May 29, 2021
Categories

How to Get By

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"I’d expected something more existential or philosophical to help with my grief — like really good art or therapy. Instead, repetitive movements and cheesy motivational sayings were getting me to a place of semi-emotional stability. After working out, I felt like I could get through the day."

From Popula
On April 22, 2021