Society

Not A Laafin Matter: Lamidi Ọláyíwọlá Àtàndá Adéyẹmí (1938-2022)

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When news broke late on 22nd April 2022, that Ọba Ọláyíwọlá Adéyẹmí III, the Aláàfin of Ọ̀yọ́, had joined his ancestors at the ripe old age of 83, there was a sense in the entire Yorùbá speaking world that a truly regnant king had departed the realm.

From Olongo Africa
On April 25, 2022
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On the Politics of Gym

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I was reading a book titled All Good Things, It was a lighthearted read and I found something rather unexpected in it; I found myself.

From Olongo Africa
On March 7, 2022
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“He Taught Us How To Teach by Learning” – Ọ̀ṣúndáre

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For Ayọ̀ Bámgbóṣé at 90

From Olongo Africa
On January 26, 2022
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Nigeria’s Holy Romance with Ignorance

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Our dealings are dominated by a disregard for scientific reasoning, and a preference for ostentatious, and often venal religiosity.

From Olongo Africa
On January 21, 2022
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Lagos to Lomé: Reflections on Borders

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All our lives, a series of crossings. The parts of our existence we are often not proud to claim still make up the sum total of our lives.

From Olongo Africa
On January 12, 2022
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Do We Need More African Sports at the Olympics?

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In over two decades of my life in Nigeria, I have only seen a skateboard once and that skateboard was owned by a man who has been labeled as eccentric by his neighbors.

From Olongo Africa
On November 10, 2021
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Negotiating African Dish Politics

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The mobility challenge faced by African cuisines in an increasingly technological age is unacceptable. So, when recently I stumbled on a writing about a certain food app called DishAfrik, with its ambitious catalogue of curated African cuisines, with a real-life cooking feature, I was overjoyed.

From Olongo Africa
On November 3, 2021
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Notes on Kampf

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One of the numerous reasons the German word, Kampf, has remained popular is its usage by the failed Austrian artist and dictator, Adolf Hitler. The word itself, ‘kampf’, from old High German, is borrowed from Latin, Campus; more familiar to us in its modern English form, ‘camp’.

From Olongo Africa
On October 21, 2021
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On Digital Obituary

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On the afternoon of my friend’s demise, I logged in to Facebook to discover a myriad of his pictures congregating people’s timelines. In those pictures, his face was distinct, sharp; his mien betraying the darkness saturating the day, binding us in that state of sadness with the thread of mourning.

From Olongo Africa
On September 1, 2021
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Thinking in Bits of Borno

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Fati Abubakar was born and grew up in Maiduguri, Borno State. With her camera, she braved the odds of bomb blasts and a terrorist group that termed education as forbidden as well as a patriarchal society, where the ideal visual of a young woman is not that of her walking around town chasing pictures. Chronicling everyday life in Borno, in the heat of an insurgency, Fati sets out with her camera as a canvas and her eyes as brushstrokes, to create an alternative ‘real’ image of Borno not just as a war zone of a theatre of trauma but a place of humanity and hope in a time of crisis.

From Olongo Africa
On August 31, 2021
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The Religious Root of Nigerian patriarchy

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The idea of feminism in Nigeria itself has been identified as a threat to men. Patriarchal structures dictate that being submissive and loyal no matter the circumstances is what a good religious woman should be. This doesn’t speak for any one religion, but rather for all: Women who identify as feminist in Nigeria are criticized and mocked using all means to dissuade us from the very idea.

From Olongo Africa
On July 20, 2021
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